Greyhound Boxer Mix: Origins, Look, Personality & More

Choosing which dog is right for your home and family can be a massive task. You need to make sure that your chosen breed is suitable for your lifestyle, that you can give it the exercise it needs and that it will get along with your children or other pets. 

Selecting a mixed breed is sometimes the best option. You can combine the amazing traits of both breeds into one and often avoid health issues that may come from selecting a purebred.

One of the most popular family pets is a Greyhound mix dog, as they often have amazing temperaments pulled from the Greyhound but also combine these with other great traits from other breeds. A Greyhound Boxer mix is one of the many options. 

Brindle Greyhound coat
It’s a wonder-fur world!

A Bit About Greyhounds

Greyhounds are one of the oldest purebred dogs, originating in Egypt to walk alongside the Pharaohs and they are also the only breed to be mentioned in the Bible. 

They were cherished and worshipped as loyal companions because of their loyal and calm temperament, but protective nature, and as sighthounds, they also had amazing vision and were quick to spot danger and prey. 

These traits were used more recently as hunters and racers, utilizing their chase instinct to make money. 

Despite their reputation for running though, they are actually very cuddly pets who love to laze around the house. Typically, Greyhounds today will retire before they reach 3 years old. There are many charities and organizations that are specifically designed to rehome retired Greyhounds once their racing days are over.  

A Bit About Boxers

Boxer dog personality
Got chimken?

In comparison, the Boxer is actually a reasonably new breed originating from Germany in the 19th century. 

Originally, the Boxer was bred from the Mastiff and Bulldog. Combined, these made a shorter and less stocky version of the Mastiff, but still with the signature brachycephalic (squashed nose) snouts. Like Greyhounds, they come in a few different colors such as brindle and the most common tan and white, for which they’re most well known. 

Being a mix of two breeds itself, the Boxer line was previously used for hunting and fighting, bred down from Mastiffs which were notorious for being able to hunt larger animals as prizes for their masters. 

Despite their background and cliche appearance, they’re actually very gentle and loving. However, they do have a protective side, so they may appear loud and aggressive to people they don’t know. It takes them a while to settle. 

The Greyhound Boxer Mix

Mixing the two breeds creates a beautiful-looking dog with a great personality that you could love forever. But we shouldn’t forget that mixing two breeds creates a lottery when it comes to what they may look like and their size. It completely depends on which genes you’re getting from which dog. Remember that female Greyhounds are quite a bit smaller than males, for example, so it depends entirely on which side of the family your puppy gets everything from – just like people. But let’s take a look at the things you’ll need to look out for. 

Personality

Much like the Greyhound, the Boxer Greyhound Mix has a calm and gentle personality. They also love to cuddle on the sofa. Despite their size, they may still think of themselves as lap dogs. 

While many people are put off by their Boxer heritage, with their appearance making them seem aggressive, they are actually very friendly and love to be around children. They also love to be part of the pack. This means they may start to get anxious if they’re left alone for too long. They would suit a family who is home during the day to keep them company.

However, as they may retain some of their Greyhound chase instinct, it’s not a great idea to have them in homes with small pets.

Greyhound Boxer Mixed Breed
I woof you!

Size

Boxers and Greyhounds are of a similar height, so when you breed them together, the puppies are likely to be similar. Both dogs are classed as ‘large dogs.’ This means that you’ll need to prepare for a large, heavy lapdog. 

Greyhounds are taller, reaching around 30 inches at the shoulder, whereas Boxers can reach up to 25 inches. 

Boxers are also much more stocky, weighing 65-70 lbs on average in adulthood. While a Greyhound can reach up to 80 lbs, they tend to average at around 60-65 lbs. 

Either way, you’ll have a stocky, large dog that loves to play. For this reason, you’ll need a home with lots of room to move around and a large outdoor space. (It might also help to have a very big sofa for cuddle time). 

Coat

Both breeds have very short hair which means they will need to wrap up in winter. Their coats come in numerous colors, but the most common is brindle, purely because this is a common color for both breeds. 

Unfortunately, neither breed is hypoallergenic. You will need to hoover regularly and they aren’t suitable for homes with people who suffer from allergies or asthma. 

Boxer Greyhound Mix
A Greyhound Boxer Mix

Common Health Issues

Both breeds are relatively healthy dogs living an average of 10-12 years. However, both breeds are prone to certain health issues as they grow older. So it’s important to prepare for veterinary care and keep their diet and exercise on track.

Puppies should always come with a guarantee. You will also need to set up insurance right away to make sure they’re covered if anything does go wrong.  

Greyhound Hip Dysplasia

If your puppy is healthy, then you probably won’t have anything to worry about until they’re older. But you should start to look out for signs of hip dysplasia – this is common in Greyhounds. This is because a lot of strain and weight is put on their hips when running. They may also be prone to pulled muscles and corns on their feet

Boxer Respiratory Issues

Boxers are typically fit and healthy physically. However, if your dog still has the squashed snout characteristic, then it may develop respiratory issues as they age. Be careful to look for signs of heavy or labored breathing or coughing. 

Victoria Richards

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